Item #757E- Vintage Early 1900's Navajo Collector's Tourist Chalcedony Whirling Logs Stamped Harvey Era Brooch/Pin

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Item #757E- Vintage Early 1900's Navajo Collector's Tourist Chalcedony Whirling Logs Stamped Harvey Era Brooch/Pin

149.95
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Nice example of early 1900's Navajo - "Harvey Era" tourist trade Indian jewelry. Made with silver plated copper or brass along with what appears to be a Swarovski diamond cut chalcedony stone. I first thought it was plastic, but couldn't shave it with my knife. The Navajo silversmith added stampwork of whirling logs, opposite pointing arrows, sunrise and full moon. All applied to a dome shaped concho with scallop edging. The silversmith finishes by attaching a long pin on back with handmade copper/brass "C" clasp. This is typical to the late 1890's - early 1900's Harvey Era jewelry Fred Harvey had created to stock his restaurants, hotels, and stores along the train routes to the west coast. Later on he expanded his empire to cover tourist areas such as Santa Fe and The Grand Canyon. He, or should I say his employees would hire native silversmiths to make both expensive and inexpensive jewelry for the tourist trade that passed through on their way to California. They would supply the silversmiths with raw material. To make a less expensive piece he supplied lower cost semi precious stones or even plastic beads to resemble turquoise. This brooch is a perfect example of that time.

The tourist brooch measures approximately 1 1/2" by 2" across and weighs 11.5 grams. Silver plated copper which most of the silver has worn off the face. I'm guessing a previous owner used a harsh liquid cleaner since it was most likely black with tarnish. I dated it as 1910's-20's, but it could be pre-1900's based on the stone used.  $149.95

 

Frederick Henry Harvey (June 27, 1835 – February 9, 1901) was an entrepreneur who developed the Harvey House lunch rooms, restaurants, souvenir shops, and hotels, which served rail passengers on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, the Gulf Coast and Santa Fe Railway, the Kansas Pacific Railway, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway, and the Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis.

An innovative restaurateur and marketer, Fred Harvey is credited with creating the first restaurant chain in the United States. He was also a leader in promoting tourism in the American Southwest in the late 19th century. Fred Harvey and his employees successfully brought new higher standards of both civility and dining to a region widely regarded in the era as "the Wild West." He created a legacy which was continued by his sons and remained in the family until the death of a grandson in 1965.

Harvey is also known for pioneering the art of commercial cultural tourism. His "Indian Detours" were meant to provide an authentic Native American experience by having actors stage a certain lifestyle in the desert in order to sell tickets to unwitting tourists.  (Wikipedia)