Item #892H- Large Heavy Vintage Pre-1948 Mexican Symbolized Overlay Sterling Cufflinks by R.B.Z.

large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-1.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-2.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-3.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-5.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-1.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-2.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-3.jpg
large-oval-mexican-sterling-silver-symbol-overlay-cuff-links-RBZ-892H-5.jpg

Item #892H- Large Heavy Vintage Pre-1948 Mexican Symbolized Overlay Sterling Cufflinks by R.B.Z.

99.95
Add To Cart

Large heavy vintage pre-1948 Mexican symbolized silver overlay cufflinks. The silversmith used a thick gauge silver in first creating a large oval base and then overlaying a thick oval displaying the cut out symbol making it appear to be deep with an oxidized silver base. Not sure what the symbol stands for, but would say based on the stair step areas it has some reference to water or running water (river). The artist finishes each cufflink by soldering stationary cufflink clasps on the back that has a slight angle with the “T” section on a swivel.

Each cufflink measures 1 1/16” by 7/8” across with the clasp extension being approximately 3/4” off the bottom of the symbolized overlay face. They each weigh 11 grams (22 grams per pair) and are heavily hallmarked and stamped on the back. Both cufflinks have the artists initials R.B.Z. - D.F. inside a circular “HECHO EN MEXICO - 925 - STERLING. All I could find out was the D.F. stands for “Distrito Federal” (The federal district of Mexico City) and R.B.Z. is the silversmiths initials (couldn’t find a corresponding name). Very nice bold, solid, and heavy vintage Mexican silver overlay cufflinks! $99.95

My understanding is the Mexican Government controlled the precious metals market (gold, silver, etc) and the silversmiths were forced to buy the raw silver or gold from the government and once they finished creating jewelry the pieces would be weighed to coincide with the raw initial purchase. That supposedly kept the smiths from mixing other metals (nickel, brass, copper) with the silver. For example, if stamped 925 sterling the weight would have to coincide with the purchase weight of the raw sterling they bought. The silversmiths would be taxed 1/5 of the value of raw silver based per piece of jewelry. Rather interesting reading the book, “The Little Book of Mexican Silver Trade and Hallmarks by Bille Hogart”.