Item # 430H- Zuni Full Wrap Inlay Turquoise Ring Bands by Gloria Chattin Multiple Sizes

zuni-turquoise-full-wrap-inlay-ring-band.JPG
zuni-turquoise-full-wrap-inlay-ring-band-1.JPG
turquoise-wedding-ring-1.jpg
zuni-turquoise-full-wrap-inlay-ring-band.JPG
zuni-turquoise-full-wrap-inlay-ring-band-1.JPG
turquoise-wedding-ring-1.jpg

Item # 430H- Zuni Full Wrap Inlay Turquoise Ring Bands by Gloria Chattin Multiple Sizes

89.95

 

Size:
Quantity:
Add To Cart

NEW!  Beautiful Zuni multiple turquoise inlay wedding ring bands. Made with sixteen (16) inlaid pieces of turquoise in a repeating pattern of two solid, two stacked, and two solid with silver channels between the stones completely around the whole band.

The bands measure 1/4" wide and the rings weigh between 4.3 grams to 4.6 grams. We have many sizes in stock and try to replace a size as soon as possible when we sell out. Check the drop down menu to see what sizes we have. The rings are hallmarked by Zuni lapidarist Gloria Chattin. Guaranteed sterling silver. Inquire about other sizes. We can order, but unfortunately Gloria is going through chemotherapy at this time and is slightly producing throughout her treatment as she feels she can. She's a real "stand up" gal and will come through. (Our prayers are with her for a swift and successful recovery!) Also, the Sleeping Beauty Mine has shut down and the cost of the turquoise has rose considerably.  $89.95

The turquoise used in these rings are natural and non-stabilized therefore the stone is still porous and sensitive to chemicals i.e. detergents, salts and oils. We recommend removing when working with any chemicals or washing of hands to maintain the natural color. If not, overtime the stone will change in color.

Zuni jewelry-making dates back to Ancestral Pueblo prehistory. Early Zuni lapidaries used stone and antler tools, wooden drills with flake stone, or cactus spine drillbits, as well as abrading tools made of wood and stone, sand for smoothing, and fiber cords for stringing. With the exception of silver jewelry, which was introduced to Zuni Pueblo in the 19th century, most of the materials commonly worked by Zuni jewelry makers in the 20th century have always been in use in the Zuni region. These include turquoise, jet, argillite, steatite, red shale, freshwater clam shell, abalone, and spiny oyster. Lanyade became the first Zuni silversmith in 1872. Kineshde, a Zuni smith of the late 1890s, is credited for first combining silver and turquoise in his jewelry. Zuni jewelers soon became known for their clusterwork. (wikipedia)