572N-Navajo Sterling Silver Multiple Kokopelli w/Turquoise Necklace by G&I Sandoval

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572N-Navajo Sterling Silver Multiple Kokopelli w/Turquoise Necklace by G&I Sandoval

149.95
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Beautiful Navajo made nine (9) piece silver Kokopelli necklace. The artists have used a total of nine (9) solid silver Kokopelli deity figures which include a larger Kokopelli with a set turquoise stone and detail along with eight smaller Kokopelli silhouette's that are split up with four (4) on each side of the necklace. The whole necklace is made with hand made silver "dot-dash" styled chain. The larger focal Kokopelli can be removed and worn with a different chain if desired. The artist's attached a spring loaded clasp to the chain.

The larger focal point Kokopelli measures approximately 2" tall by 1 1/4" across with the smaller silhouette Kokopelli's measuring  1 1/8" by 5/8" across. The complete necklace measures 25 1/2" end to end with a wearable length of 14". It weighs 34.4 grams (1.21 ounces or 1.11 troy ounces) and is signed GS - Copyright Insignia - STERLING by husband and wife silversmiths Glen and Irene Sandoval. Very nice necklace!  $149.95

Kokopelli is a fertility deity, usually depicted as a humpbacked flute player (often with feathers or antenna-like protrusions on his head), who has been venerated by some Native American cultures in the Southwestern United States. Like most fertility deities, Kokopelli presides over both childbirth and agriculture. He is also a trickster god and represents the spirit of music.

Among the Hopi, Kokopelli carries unborn children on his back and distributes them to women; for this reason, young girls often fear him. He often takes part in rituals relating to marriage, and Kokopelli himself is sometimes depicted with a consort, a woman called Kokopelmimi by the Hopi. It is said that Kokopelli can be seen on the full and waning moon, much like the "rabbit on the moon". Kokopelli also presides over the reproduction of game animals, and for this reason, he is often depicted with animal companions such as rams and deer. Other common creatures associated with him include sun-bathing animals such as snakes, or water-loving animals like lizards and insects. In his domain over agriculture, Kokopelli's flute-playing chases away the winter and brings about spring. Many tribes, such as the Zuni, also associate Kokopelli with the rains. He frequently appears with Paiyatamu, another flutist, in depictions of maize-grinding ceremonies. Some tribes say he carries seeds and babies on his back.  (wikipedia)