Item #797F- Vintage Navajo Turquoise Shadowbox Rings Maisels sz.11 1/4 & 11 1/2

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Item #797F- Vintage Navajo Turquoise Shadowbox Rings Maisels sz.11 1/4 & 11 1/2

99.95
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Nice vintage old stock Navajo turquoise shadowbox rings! The silversmith has uses a round cut and polished turquoise stone setting it into a smooth bezel and mounting it to an oxidized silver base. The silversmith adds a large silver drop to each side of the stone and overlays a silver band which has been slit to create a shadowbox effect and expose the stone and decoration of the ring face. We have two (2) of the rings and they have never been worn. The size 11 1/2 has a light blue-green stone with brown matrix where the size 11 1/4 has a solid blue-green turquoise.

The ring faces measure 3/4" by 3/4" across measured from silver drop to silver drop. They both weigh 8.3 grams and are pictured left to right a size 11 1/4 and a size 11 1/2. Both have the Maisel Kachina - STER. hallmark. Guaranteed sterling silver. The Maisels Indian Trading Post was first established in 1939 and used only Native artist to create the jewelry and crafts. Very nice old stock Navajo rings!  $99.95 ea.

Established by Morris and Syma Maisel in 1939 to cater to the new U.S. Route 66 tourist trade, this Pueblo Revival building was designed by architect John Gaw Meem. The building features murals designed by Olive Rush. Various murals depicting Indian life were painted by ten Pueblo and Navajo artists such as Narcisco Abeyta, Harrison Begay, and Awa Tsireh. The trading post employed hundreds of native craftspeople in its heyday. It closed upon its founder's death, only to be reopened in the 1980s by Morris' grandson, Skip. It continues to trade as Skip Maisel's Indian Jewelry and Crafts. (Wikipedia)