Item# Sitting Bull

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Item# Sitting Bull

489.95

SITTING BULL by Neil Munn

(Tatanka Iyotaka)

1831-1890

Hunkpapa Sioux Leader and Medicine Man

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Most recent painting of Indian Chiefs by Neil Munn done on a deer hide with acrylics. Sitting Bull is best known for leading the victory and massacre at Little Big Horn against Gen. George Custer. Neil has applied detail to the facial features and gradually faded into the rustic back drop using shades of brown along with the white base. The hide measures approximately 57" long to the tip of the tail by 39" across the widest span. We have one picture showing a peace pipe across the top just to give you ideas of how you can decorate the wall hanging using pipes, crossed arrows, beadwork, etc. We have noted the two small stitched areas. The longer stitching is to the right of Sitting Bulls face along the edge and the smaller one is close to the bottom left on hide. They give the piece an added vintage appearance.  $489.00

SITTING BULL, Sioux chief, born about 1837.  He was the principal chief of the Dakota Sioux,

 

 

Dec. 25, 1877

Readers of the Butte Miner wake up to a Christmas Day report that gives a glimpse of Sitting Bull’s version of the Battle of the Little Bighorn 18 months earlier.

Martin Marty of Indiana, a Benedictine abbot who has lived with the Sioux and speaks their language, followed Sitting Bull and his people into Canada after the battle. He stayed in the camp for eight days last spring, and the St. Louis Globe-Democrat has now passed on his report of the visit.

The American accounts of the battle are all wrong, the Hunkpapa chief claims. The Indians had 11 days warning that the soldiers were coming. Lt. George Custer’s Seventh Cavalrymen were too tired to fight, the horses broken down by hard travel and no food. The soldiers “had been so long in the saddle that they were overcome by sleep,” Sitting Bull said.

There were not the massive numbers of Indians involved in the fight as most reports had it, but they still outnumbered Custer’s men six to one. The annihilation was over in a few minutes.

“Our powder was scarce, and we killed the soldiers with our war clubs,” the chief told Marty. “The soldiers … were killed so quick they did not have time to fight us.”

Sitting Bull said the Sioux did not recognize Custer in the fight, and they did not know him to call him “Long Hair.”

 

By KIM BRIGGEMAN of the Missoulian